Archive for August, 2017

Canine Influenza outbreak caused by a new strain of virus H3N2 from Asia

Sunday, August 27th, 2017

Midwest Canine Influenza outbreak caused by new strain of virus

April 12, 2015 By Joe Schwartz

ITHACA, N.Y. – The canine influenza outbreak afflicting more than 1,000 dogs in Chicago and other parts of the Midwest is caused by a different strain of the virus than was earlier assumed, according to laboratory scientists at Cornell University and the University of Wisconsin. Researchers at Cornell say results from additional testing indicate that the outbreak is being caused by a virus closely related to Asian strains of influenza A H3N2 viruses, currently in wide circulation in southern Chinese and South Korean dog populations since being identified in 2006. There is no evidence that it can be transmitted to humans.

The outbreak in the Midwest had been attributed to the H3N8 strain of virus, which was identified in the U.S. dog population in 2004 and has been circulating since. The H3N2 virus had not been previously detected in North America. The outbreak in Chicago suggests a recent introduction of the H3N2 virus from Asia.

Testing of clinical samples from the outbreak conducted at The New York State Animal Diagnostic Laboratory at Cornell indicated that the virus was Influenza A. Further testing led researchers to believe a new strain was at fault. Subsequent testing, carried out with the assistance of the Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, identified the new subtype as H3N2. The National Veterinary Services Laboratories in Ames, IA is sequencing two isolates from this outbreak, which were isolated at Cornell, to facilitate rapid complete characterization of the viruses.

Both Influenza strains can cause high fever, loss of appetite, coughing, nasal discharge, and lethargy. Symptoms may be more severe in cases caused by the H3N2 virus. Some infected dogs may not show symptoms at all.

H3N2 has caused infection and respiratory illness in cats.

Veterinary professionals are advised that diagnostic testing of samples from sick pets can be done using a broadly targeted Influenza A matrix reverse transciptase-polymerase chain reaction assay (Rt-PCR). The canine-specific Influenza A H3N8 Rt-PCR in use in several laboratories will not detect this virus. Serology is also currently not available as the H3N2 virus is different enough from H3N8 that antibodies may not cross react. However, an H3N2-specific serologic assay is under development and will be available soon.

It is not known if the current vaccine will provide any protection from this new virus. It does protect against H3N8, which is in circulation in some areas. Other preventive advice remains the same: In areas where the viruses are active, avoid places where dogs congregate, such as dog parks and grooming salons.

Owners of symptomatic dogs and cats should consult our office.

It is our pleasure to serve you and your pets. Please do not hesitate to call our offices (708-383-3606) if you have any questions or concerns. Thank you for allowing us to be a part of your veterinary healthcare team.

 

Senior Pets – Part 3 of 3

Tuesday, August 22nd, 2017

 

Dog patient

One of our very patient patients.

In our three part series of posts on Senior and geriatric pets we focused on:

Part 1: Describing/defining a senior or geriatric pet

Part 2: Important Conditions and Focus Areas for an aging pet

 

 

Now in part 3 of our 3 part posts we will focus on Medical Management / Early Detection and Screening

Medical Management / Early Detection and Screening

Cat patient

Dr. Toncray enjoying a patient.

   Although the list of medical conditions can be very long in our older pets, many of them can be managed successfully. We advise our patient’s caregivers to consider a senior health care plan that will target early detection and treatment.

Early detection will allow for prompt, specific care for your pet that will prevent, delay, or temper an illness, extend life span, promote increased quality of life and extend the human-animal bond.  It begins by defining baseline values for your pet as they move into their senior life stage. This will help set the foundation to provide the best preventive and medical care for the years ahead. It continues with frequent evaluation, therapy and monitoring as medical conditions require.

 

Physical Examinations

Dr. Leslie monitoring the weight of one of our feline patients

   A complete and thorough physical examination will help localize and uncover any problems or suspect areas. Initially annual exams are advised, however, increasing the examination frequency to two times a year as your pet ages will increase the chance of detecting a problem early. We recommend monitoring body weight more frequently, 2-4 times a year. You can come in and use our scale in the waiting area.

 

 

Observations and History

    Dialogue between our doctors and pet owners in this life stage is exceptionally valuable.

older dogs eye issues

Dr. Swindell consulting with a client.

Observations and notations of subtle changes in interactions and day-to-day routines can provide important information and direction for early detection of health issues. Education on what signs to watch for and their significance can heighten detection of early changes.

 

Laboratory and diagnostic testing

Routine diagnostic tests can give additional depth to your pet’s health evaluation

Simple blood test

and can specifically target organ system changes at a significantly earlier time than waiting for abnormal symptoms to present on a physical exam.

These tests may include: complete blood cell counts, serum chemistry panels and a urinalysis. Each pet has a unique set of examination findings and pertinent history which may require more specialized diagnostics that specifically meet their needs.

 

Dr. Richerson listening to the internal sounds of a patient.

 

We understand that the senior/geriatric life stage can be more demanding than the younger adult years. However, by approaching their health care preemptively we can minimize those demands and allow our pets to be happy, active and healthy members of our family for years to come.

cardiatric patient

Dr. Carlson and a patient.

 

 

 

 

It is our pleasure to serve you and your pets. Please do not hesitate to call our offices (708-383-3606) if you have any questions or concerns. Thank you for allowing us to be a part of your veterinary healthcare team.

 

Senior Pets – part 2 of 3

Wednesday, August 9th, 2017

Aging is not a disease

In our first of three posts on Senior Pets, we reported the good news that our pets are living longer and healthier lives. We celebrated our privilege of participating in this change during the 37 years of our practice. We covered the definitions of aging and what this means for our pets.

In this post we address: Important Conditions and  Focus Areas

The conditions below can contribute to illness as well as play a vital role in maintaining optimal quality of life and longevity. All these areas are interconnected physiologically in our senior pets and each pet’s health condition as it ages. We know that because of this each pet requires its own unique treatment plan. Our doctors and staff at CAH can advise and completely review your pet’s needs in order to plan out a specific senior/geriatric health care course with you and your pet.

I. Nutrition and Body Condition

Dietary needs change with age and many common diseases and age-related conditions can benefit from shifts in nutrition as part of prevention and treatment. Overall body condition as well as body weight play critical roles in senior health.

II. Oral/dental health

Dog teeth brushing

Good oral health helps to extend pets’ lives

The mouth, teeth, and gums can be an easy portal of entry for bacteria as well as a source of pain and discomfort if not maintained in the later years of life.

 

 

 

III. Gastrointestinal

The GI tract is highly complex and has many roles in the body. Digestive efficiency and body requirements can shift with age and maintaining optimal health of the entire gastrointestinal system will significantly impact our dog and cats longevity.

Keeping pets flexible

Dr. Swindell examining a patient for orthopedic flexibility.

IV. Orthopedic conditions and mobility

Movement and exercise are essential during the senior years. Addressing health issues such as arthritis and muscle strength will allow your pet to maintain mobility and pain-free movement.

V. Endocrine/ Hormones

One of the most common areas in which our geriatric veterinary patients experience functional changes is in hormone production. Thyroid, adrenal and insulin hormones are the most commonly involved. Fortunately, the majority of these conditions are very responsive to treatment and can be managed successfully. Early detection can make this management less complicated.

VI. Cardiovascular/Renal/Respiratory

Dopper to analyze a pet's heart murmur

Doppler image of blood flow in a pet’s heart.

These organ systems also have numerous changes as they age. Here too, many of these common conditions can be slowed and managed to maximize the working lifetime of these organs. Often times months to years of quality life can be added to our pet’s life expectancy.

 

 

 

VII. Skin

Healthy skin is important for our seniors and coat quality and changes can be early indicators of health changes. Masses and lumps are common at this life stage and should be discussed and evaluated.

VIII. Mental Health/ cognition/ behavior

Our pets do face behavioral and cognitive/neurological changes as they age. These changes can be addressed in a variety of ways, some through nutrition, environmental changes, and medications.

IX. Sensory

nuclear sclerosis

We illuminated Fluffy’s eye to show her mild lenticular sclerosis.

Changes in the major senses especially eyesight and hearing can require adjustments in environment and lifestyle to prevent injury and anxiety.

 

 

 

X. Environmental Conditions

Older pets will usually need changes in their environment and lifestyle to accommodate their health care needs and still provide and promote safe movement and mental stimulation.

 

 

XI. Pain Management and Pharmacology

Senior health conditions that might have discomfort or pain associated with them should be targeted and treated either temporarily or long term as the condition requires. All drugs must be used with the most current knowledge of  senior/geriatric metabolism to prevent drug related illness or toxicity.

In the third of our three part series on Senior and geriatric pets our next post will focus on:

In our next post, Part 3 of 3, we will focus on: 

Medical Management / Early Detection and Screening. 

It is our pleasure to serve you and your pets. Please do not hesitate to call our offices (708-383-3606) if you have any questions or concerns. Thank you for allowing us to be a part of your veterinary healthcare team.