Archive for August, 2016

Heart murmurs in Cats

Tuesday, August 30th, 2016
cat heart murmur

Dr. Swindell listening to a patient’s heart.

During an examination we sometimes detect a heart murmur in a cat, but this finding is not always cause for immediate concern. During an exam we have two primary goals:

  • Identify any issues
  • Educate you as a pet caretaker

We want to make certain that you understand what having a heart murmur, or any of your pet’s medical conditions, mean.  Having and understanding this information will then help you to make educated decisions about your cat’s care.

Scoring a cat’s heart murmur

You have seen us use our stethoscope every time you have brought your pet in for a check-up or visit. When we listen with our stethoscope to a cat’s heart we can pick up subtleties in the sounds. So when we hear a heart murmur in a cat we are assessing loudness, pitch, and in which stage of the heart beat the murmur is occurring.

Veterinarians always grade a heart murmur. We use a 1-6 scale to grade the loudness of a murmur, therefore we have something objective we can track over time. Grade 1 is hardly audible with a stethoscope, while grade 6 is not only audible with our stethoscope, but is also palpable with a hand on the outside of the chest. There is no defined rule that a heart murmur will get louder as the disease affecting the heart progresses, but it often will. (more…)

Inappropriate Elimination Disorders in Cats

Wednesday, August 10th, 2016

One of the most common behavioral problems we see in our feline patients are “elimination disorders.” Your heart drops when you discover that your beloved kitty is using locations other than their litter box to urinate and/or defecate. This can cause a great deal of stress for both the you and pets in the household. We know how hard this can be and want to help you deal with the problem as quickly as possible. Tell us about this as soon as you know or suspect anything is amiss.

Our job as your veterinarian is to determine if the disorders is due to a medical or behavioral problem – or both.

Behavioral or Medical problem

Before deciding that the problem is behavioral, we must first rule out a medical problem.  We recommend a thorough physical examination and some tests. These are  what we call ‘a minimum diagnostic database.’ We’ll get a complete blood count, serum chemistry profile, total T4, fecal analysis, and urinalysis. These tests tell us a lot and my preclude, or indicate, additional diagnostics.

If we identify a medical disorder,  we’ll recommend the therapy based on our knowledge and experience. We’ll confer with you as to what to expect from the treatment. (more…)