Senior pets – Part 1 of 3

Senior/ Geriatric Pet Health

We are happy to report that our pets are living much longer healthier lives. We’ve been a part of the great changes in veterinary medicine for these 35+ years and continue to keep up with the pace of the advancements.

No matter the life stage – growth, adult, senior/geriatric – we work hard to help you make the best of each of your pet’s stages. We have particularly focused on the senior/geriatric stages . The medical staff at Carlson Animal Hospital can help provide the most current and advanced medical care to help you and your pet navigate this complex life stage.

The senior/geriatric pet 

The exact definition of a senior or geriatric pet varies. Due to differences in species (feline versus canine), breed, and size, there is not an exact year that defines senior or geriatric. One guideline states that pets are seniors if they are in the last 25% of their predicted lifespan for their species and breed. This is when they are at significantly higher risk for numerous health conditions and disorders. The generally accepted veterinary guidelines are:

1) cats and small to medium size dogs are considered senior/geriatric at age 7 years and older

2) larger breed dogs with naturally shorter life spans are considered senior at age 6.

Often the term senior refers to the earlier part of this life stage and geriatric refers to the latter years. Many cat and dog caregivers like to equate their pet’s age with comparable human years and there are several conversion charts and formulas devised to attempt those comparisons.

In addition to the above table the American Veterinary Medical Association lists the oldest recorded age of a cat at 34 years old.The oldest recorded age of a dog at 29 years old. Recent statistics report that between 33% and 50% of all the dogs and cats in the United States are now 7 years of age or older.

Aging

Aging itself is not a disease. There are physiologic changes that occur as the body ages. They involve the gradual and irreversible loss of function of the body’s organ systems as well as any reserve capability they may have.  During the aging process, individual cells and the cell cycles begin to decrease to the point where they stop functioning altogether. Throughout the pet’s lifetime, outside influences/insults from the environment have also been exerting effects on the body systems and its innate genetic programming.

In our next two posts we expand and focus on:

Part 2 of 3: Important Conditions and  Focus Areas

Part 3 of 3: Medical Management / Early Detection and Screening

 

It is our pleasure to serve you and your pets. Please do not hesitate to call our offices (708-383-3606) if you have any questions or concerns. Thank you for allowing us to be a part of your veterinary healthcare team.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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